DeepSec 2019 Training: Mobile Hacking – Davy Douhine and Guillaume Lopes

Sanna/ October 24, 2019/ Training

Guillaume Lopes and Davy Douhine, senior pentesters, will share many techniques, tips and tricks with pentesters, bug bounty researchers or just the curious in a 100% “hands-on” training. Their goal is to introduce tools(Adb, Apktool, Jadx, Androguard, Cycript, Drozer, Frida, Hopper, Needle, MobSF, etc.) and techniques to help you to work faster and in a more efficient way in the mobile ecosystem. This is exactly the training that you would have liked to have before wasting your precious time trying and failing while testing. Agenda Two days based mainly on practical exercises: – Day 1: Android Hacking – Day 2: iOS Hacking Main topics of the training are based on the fresh OWASP MSTG (Mobile Security Testing Guide): – Review the codebase of a mobile app (aka static analysis) – Run the app on

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DeepSec Training: Black Belt Pentesting / Bug Hunting Secrets you’ve always wanted to know

René Pfeiffer/ August 26, 2019/ Conference, Security, Training

The Web and its technologies have become the perfect frontier for security experts for finding bugs and getting a foothold when doing penetration tests. Everything has a web server these days. And everything web server will happily talk to web clients. The components involved are more than just simple HTML and JavaScript. The developer notion of doing things full stack requires security experts to do the same. This is where our DeepSec 2019 training session Black Belt Pentesting / Bug Hunting Millionaire: Mastering Web Attacks with Full-Stack Exploitation by Dawid Czagan comes into play. Dawid Czagan will show you how modern applications work, how they interact, and how you can analyse their inner workings. He will enable you to efficiently test applications, find bugs, and compile the set of information needed to fix the

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DeepSec Training: Black Belt Pentesting / Bug Hunting Millionaire – Mastering Web Attacks with Full-Stack Exploitation

René Pfeiffer/ August 19, 2019/ Conference, Training

Web applications are gateways for users and attackers alike. Web technology is used to grant access to information, public and sensitive alike. The latest example is the Biostar 2 software, a web-based biometric security smart lock platform application. During a security test the auditors were able to access over 1 million fingerprint records, as well as facial recognition information. How can you defend against leaks like this? Well, you have to understand all layers of the application stack. Modern web applications are complex and it’s all about full-stack nowadays. That’s why you need to dive into full-stack exploitation if you want to master web attacks and maximize your payouts. Say no to classic web application hacking. Join the training session at DeepSec 2019 and take advantage of Dawid Czagan’s unique hands-on exercises and become

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Special Offer for “Mastering Web Attacks with Full-Stack Exploitation” Training – get 3 for the Price of 1

René Pfeiffer/ November 19, 2018/ Conference

The DeepSec training Bug Hunting Millionaire: Mastering Web Attacks with Full-Stack Exploitation by Dawid Czagan has some seats left. Dawid has agreed to give away free access to two of his online courses for everyone booking tickets until Wednesday, 21 November 2018 (2359 CET). This gives you a perfect preparation for penetration testing, software development, and an edge for any bug bounty programmes out there. You can get a glimpse of the online trainings, well, online of course. Every penetration test and every attempt to defend your own assets can’t do without knowledge of web technologies. Since the Web has evolved from being simple HTML content, you absolutely have to know about all layers modern web applications use. The training will give you the means to understand what’s going on, to find bugs, and

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Last Call for your Web Application Security Training – Break all teh Web and enjoy it!

René Pfeiffer/ November 9, 2018/ Conference, Security

The Internet is full of web applications. Sysadmins used to joke that HTTP is short for Hypertext Tunnelling Protocol, because anything but web content is transported via HTTP these days. It’s the best way to break out of restricted environment, too. So the chances are good that you will need the skills for dealing with all kinds web. Fortunately our training Bug Hunting Millionaire: Mastering Web Attacks with Full-Stack Exploitation conducted by Dawid Czagan has a few seats left. Don’t get distracted by the title. Focus on the phrase full-stack exploitation. It’s not just about sending HTTP requests and seeing what the application does. It’s all about using the full spectrum of components and technologies used for modern web applications. The training is not only suited for information security researchers. The course addresses REST

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DeepSec 2018 Training: Advanced Infrastructure Hacking – Anant Shrivastava

Sanna/ November 5, 2018/ Conference, Training

Whether you are penetration testing, Red Teaming or trying to get a better understanding of managing vulnerabilities in your environment, understanding advanced hacking techniques is critical. This course covers a wide variety of neat, new and ridiculous techniques to compromise modern Operating Systems and networking devices. We asked Anant a few more questions about his training. Please tell us the top 5 facts about your training. Constantly evolving course: Every year each iteration has something new added to it. (Minimum 25%, maximum 50% of the course gets an upgrade every year). Developed by Practitioners: The course is developed by regular pentesters deriving challenges from real life pen-testing scenarios. All of our trainers are full time pentesters and part time trainers. Covers a whole breadth of infrastructure: From IPv4/v6 to databases, to OSINT, Windows, Linux,

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DeepSec2018 Talk: Manipulating Human Memory for Fun and Profit – Stefan Schumacher

Sanna/ October 31, 2018/ Conference, Discussion

Manipulating the Human Memory for Fun and Profit, or: Why you’ve never met Bugs Bunny in DisneyLand Hacking is not limited to technical things — like using a coffee machine to cook a soup — but also makes use of social engineering. Social engineering is the (mis)use of human behaviour like fixed action patterns, reciprocity or commitment and consistency. Simple social engineering attacks like phishing mails do not require much preparation, but more complex ones do so. Especially when one wants to set up some kind of advanced persistent threat in the psychological domain. So, besides the psychological fundamentals of social engineering we also did research on human memory, how it works, how it pretty much fails to store what really happened, and how it can be misused for a sinister purpose. The fundamental

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DeepSec 2018 Training: Professional Bug Hunting for Early Bird Millionaires – Sensitive Data Exposure

René Pfeiffer/ September 24, 2018/ Training

DeepSec’s Early Bird Tariff is still valid for today. If you are interested in bug hunting for money, i.e. bug bounties, then you should hurry. Dawid Czagan is conducting a training at DeepSec 2018 where you can learn all you need to get started. If you don’t know what to expect, we recommend one of Dawid’s online courses to get into the mindset. His tutorial on finding sensitive data exposure is available via his web site. In case you are interested, please head over to our ticket shop. Early bird tickets are still available until midnight! 

DeepSec 2018 Training: Advanced Penetration Testing in the Real World – Davy Douhine & Guillaume Lopes

Sanna/ September 24, 2018/ Conference, Security, Training

Guillaume and Davy, senior pentesters, will share many techniques, tips and tricks with pentesters, red teamers, bug bounty researchers or even defenders during a 2-day 100% “hands-on” workshop. This is the very training you’d like to have instead of wasting your precious time trying and failing while pentesting. The main topics of the training are: Buffer overflow 101: Find and exploit buffer overflows yourself and bypass OS protections. (A lot of pentesters don’t even know how it works. So let’s have a look under the hood); Web exploitation: Manually find and exploit web app vulnerabilities using Burpsuite. (Yes, running WebInspect, AppScan, Acunetix or Netsparker is fine but you can do a lot more by hand); Network exploitation: Manually exploit network related vulnerabilities using Scapy, ettercap and Responder. (Because it works so often when doing

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DeepSec 2018 Talk: Injecting Security Controls into Software Applications – Katy Anton

Sanna/ September 20, 2018/ Conference, Security

“SQL Injection was first mentioned in a 1998 article in Phrack Magazine. Twenty years later, injection is still a common occurrence in software applications (No.1 in latest OWASP Top 10 2017). For the last 20 years, we have been focusing on vulnerabilities from an attacker’s point of view and SQL injection is still King. Something else must be done.”, says Katy Anton. “What if there is another way to look at software vulnerabilities? Can vulnerabilities be decomposed into security controls familiar to developers? Which security controls are an absolute must-have, and which additional security measures do you need to take into account? These are hard questions as evidenced by the numerous insecure applications we still have today. Attend this talk to explore security vulnerabilities from a different angle. As part of this talk, we

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Whatever happened to CipherSaber?

René Pfeiffer/ September 11, 2018/ High Entropy

Some of you still know how a modem sounds. Back in the days of 14400 baud strong encryption was rare. Compression was king. Every bit counted. And you had to protect yourself. This is where CipherSaber comes into play. Given the exclusive use of strong cryptographic algorithms by government authorities, the CipherSaber algorithm was meant to be easy enough to be memorised, and yet strong enough to protect messages from being intercepted in clear. It is based on the RC4 algorithm. According to the designer CipherSaber can be implemented in a few lines of code. Basically you have crypto to go which cannot be erased from the minds of the public, because it is readily available. That’s where the name came from. It is modelled after the light sabers found in the Star Wars

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DeepSec Training: Bug Bounty Hunting – How Hackers Find SQL Injections in Minutes with Sqlmap

René Pfeiffer/ September 7, 2018/ Security, Training

In a previous article we talked about the Bug Bounty Hunting training by Dawid Czagan at DeepSec 2018. In case you do now know what to expect, there is a little teaser consisting of a full blown tutorial for you. Dawid has published as video tutorial that shows you how to use Sqlmap in order to find SQL injections. It serves as a perfect example of what to expect from his two-day training and what you absolutely need to play with for preparation. DeepSec trainings are in-depth, not superficial. Dawid’s training will go into much deeper detail. Software developers are well advised to use attack tools against their own creations. It helps to understand what error conditions your code might be in and what you have to do when sanitising data. SQL injection attacks

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DeepSec 2018 Talk: Cracking HiTag2 Crypto – Weaponising Academic Attacks for Breaking and Entering – Kevin Sheldrake

Sanna/ September 6, 2018/ Conference, Security

HiTag2 is an Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) technology operating at 125KHz.  It is distinguished from many others in the same field by its use of 2-way communications for authentication and its use of encryption to protect the data transmissions – the majority of RFID technologies at 125KHz feature no authentication or encryption at all.  As a result it has been widely used to provide secure building access and has also been used as the technology that implements car immobilisers. In 2012, academic researchers Roel Verdult, Flavio D. Garcia and Josep Balasch published the seminal paper, ‘Gone in 360 Seconds: Hijacking with Hitag2’ that presented three attacks on the encryption system used in HiTag2; in 2016 Garcia et al presented a further attack in ‘Lock It and Still Lose It’.  They implemented their attacks on the Proxmark 3 device

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DeepSec 2018 Talk: Defense Informs Offense Improves Defense – How to Compromise an ICS Network and How to Defend It – Joe Slowik

Sanna/ September 5, 2018/ Conference, Security

Industrial control system (ICS) attacks have an aura of sophistication, high barriers to entry, and significant investment in time and resources. Yet when looking at the situation – especially recent attacks – from a defender’s perspective, nothing could be further from the truth. Initial attack, lateral movement, and entrenchment within an ICS network requires – and probably operates best – via variations of ‘pen tester 101’ actions combined with some knowledge of the environment and living off the land. Only after initial access is achieved and final targets are identified do adversaries need to enhance their knowledge of ICS-specific environments to deliver disruptive (or destructive) impacts resulting in a potentially large pool of adversaries capable of conducting operations. Examining concrete ICS attack examples allows us to explore just what is needed to breach and

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DeepSec 2018 Special Training: Bug Hunting Millionaire – Mastering Web Attacks with Full-Stack Exploitation

René Pfeiffer/ August 29, 2018/ Conference, Security, Training

How do bugs in software get fixed? Well, first of all you have to find them. All code has bugs. Most probably, that is. Usually developers and users of applications find bugs. The history of information security has taught us that now attackers also look for bugs in software. Therefore flaws in code leading to security vulnerabilities have a higher priority for both developers and adversaries. The problem is that software testing finds all kinds of bugs and not always the important ones. Where is the incentive to go and debug software? Well, there is quality assurance, there is full disclosure, and now there are bug bounties. Bug bounties are rewards for bugs in software that have an impact on security. Companies offer these bounties as a means of software quality testing. Bug bounties

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