Use Handshake Data to create TLS Fingerprints

René Pfeiffer/ May 25, 2019/ Discussion, Security

While the whole world busily works on the next round of the Crypto Wars, the smart people work on actual information security. TLS has always been in the focus of inspection. Using on-the-fly generated certificates to look inside is a features of many gadgets and filter applications. Peeking at the data is moot if you control either the server or the client. If you have to break TLS on purpose (hopefully) inside your own network, you probably have to deal with software or system you cannot control. In this case TLS is the least of your security problems. Dealing with a lot of network traffic often uses a metadata approach in order not to process gigantic amounts of data. Enter TLS fingerprinting. The TLS handshake contains a lot of parameters such as version numbers,

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Network Security right from the Beginning – Introducing DHCP-over-TLS (DoT)

René Pfeiffer/ April 1, 2019/ High Entropy

Every security researcher knows: If you want to secure a system, do it as early as possible. This is why Trusted Computing, Secure Boot, Trusted Execution Technology, and many more technologies were invented – to get the operating system safely off the ground right at boot time. After the booting process additional components have to be initialised. Dependencies are common in this stage. The second most important resource next to the local machine is the network. Most modern programming languages highly rely on network connection to get any work done. Local storage and memory is merely a big cache for temporary data to them. So how do you create a trusted boot process beyond the initial network configuration? The answer is easy. You just combine two highly mature and reliable protocols – Dynamic Host

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Infrastructure Update – Privacy Shield, Call for Papers, DNSSEC, ROOTS, and Humidity

René Pfeiffer/ July 11, 2018/ Administrivia, High Entropy

Our blog has been a bit silent in the past weeks, because we had to move some stuff around and rearrange our infrastructure. The old office had a problem with too much water. Leaking is for whistleblowers, not water pipes. Rain is fine if the water can get to the drains. If you take a look at the photograph, imagine the scene with Summer temperatures and a high dose of humidity. Moving infrastructure around is a lot more fun when having APIs, lots of bandwidth, and server minions to take care of the storage. This wasn’t the case with our office infrastructure in meatspace. So we did a bit of a workout. It’s amazing what ancient hardware you can find when sorting through real storage space. Remember AUI Ethernet connectors with matching network interface

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Upgrade to HTTP2

René Pfeiffer/ March 23, 2018/ Administrivia

We are busy with a little housekeeping. Among other things we have changed the way you can access our blog. It is now using HTTP2. We also added encryption and redirect all HTTP requests to HTTPS. Search engines should update their caches as soon as they refresh the pages. Hopefully this does not break anything. If so, please let us know. The DeepSec blog has been long using HTTP only. This was due to infrastructure constraints. Since future versions of web browsers will give you a warning when surfing to a HTTP site, we decided to change the blog configuration. You might want to do the same before June 2018. Otherwise you might get some enquiries about the security warning. Next stop: TLS 1.3.

Secret Router Security Discussion in Germany

René Pfeiffer/ January 26, 2018/ Internet, Security

Routers are the main component when it comes to connect sites, homes, and businesses. They often „just“ take care of the access to the Internet. The firewall comes after this access device. The German Telekom suffered an attack on their routers on 2016. The German Federal Office for Information Security now tries to create a policy for securing these critical systems. In theory this should add a set of documents on how to securely operate a router for the last mile access. Information security basically runs on checklists and policies. The trouble starts with the firmware. In Germany these is a discussion about using alternative devices as access components, enabling customers and organisations to use products of their own choice. Since firmware is the worst code on this planet, changing models and code is

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Google supports DeepSec 2017

René Pfeiffer/ October 12, 2017/ Conference, Internet

You have probably heard of Google. Well, you will be hearing more from them if you come to DeepSec 2017. They have agreed to support our conference. They will be on site, and you will be able to talk to them. Every year we aim to give you opportunities for a short-cut, for exchanging ideas, and for thinking of ways to improve information security. A big part of this process is fulfilled by vendors and companies offering service in the information security industry. This includes the many good people at CERTs and the countless brave individuals in the respective security team. So we hope you take advantage of Google’s presence at DeepSec. See you in Vienna!

The Sound of „Cyber“ of Zero Days in the Wild – don’t forget the Facts

René Pfeiffer/ January 26, 2017/ Discussion, High Entropy

The information security world is full of buzzwords. This fact is partly due to the relationship with information technology. No trend goes without the right amount of acronyms and leetspeaktechnobabble. For many decades this was not a problem. A while ago the Internet entered mainstream. Everyone is online. The digital world is highly connected. Terms such as cyber, exploit, (D)DoS, or encryption are used freely in news items. Unfortunately they get mixed up with words from earlier decades leading to cyber war(fare), crypto ransom(ware), dual use, or digital assets. Some phrases are here to stay. So let’s talk about the infamous cyber again. In case you have not seen Zero Days by Alex Gibney, then go and watch it. It is a comprehensive documentary about the Stuxnet malware and elements of modern warfare (i.e.

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DeepSec 2016 Talk: TLS 1.3 – Lessons Learned from Implementing and Deploying the Latest Protocol – Nick Sullivan

Sanna/ October 19, 2016/ Conference, Development, Internet, Security

Version 1.3 is the latest Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol, which allows client/server applications to communicate over the Internet in a way that is designed to prevent eavesdropping, tampering, and message forgery. TLS is the S in HTTPS. TLS was last changed in 2008, and a lot of progress has been made since then. CloudFlare will be the first company to deploy this on a wide scale. In his talk Nick Sullivan will be able to discuss the insights his team gained while implementing and deploying this protocol. Nick will explore differences between TLS 1.3 and previous versions in detail, focusing on the security improvements of the new protocol as well as some of the challenges his team faces around securely implementing new features such as 0-RTT resumption. He’ll also demonstrate an attack on the way some

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DeepSec 2016 Talk: Unveiling Patchwork – Gadi Evron

Sanna/ October 17, 2016/ Conference, Internet, Security Intelligence

Nation state attacks are very popular – in the news and in reality. High gain, low profile, maximum damage. From the point of information security it is always very insightful to study the anatomy of these attacks once they are known. Looking at ways components fail, methods adversaries use for their own advantage, and thinking of possible remedies strengthens your defence. At DeepSec 2016 Gadi Evron will share knowledge about an operation that went after government systems all around the world. Patchwork is a highly successful nation state targeted attack operation, which infected approximately 2,500 high-value targets such as governments, worldwide. It is the first targeted threat captured using a commercial cyber deception platform. In his talk Gadi Evron will share how deception was used to catch the threat actor, and later on secure their second stage malware

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DeepSec 2016 Talk: Exploiting First Hop Protocols to Own the Network – Paul Coggin

Sanna/ October 16, 2016/ Conference, Internet, Security

At DeepSec 2016 Paul Coggin will focus on how to exploit a network by targeting the various first hop protocols. Attack vectors for crafting custom packets as well as a few of the available tools for layer 2 network protocols exploitation will be covered. Paul will provide you with defensive mitigations and recommendations for adding secure visualization and instrumentation for layer 2. He kindly answered a few questions beforehand: Please tell us the top facts about your talk. The presentation focuses on commonly overlooked layer 2 security issues. In many cases penetration testers and auditors focus on the upper layers of the OSI model and miss the low hanging fruit at layer 2. The talk will cover both offensive exploit techniques and methods for securing networks. Multicast switching and routing protocols, router redundancy protocols, IPv6 and other

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Smart Homes are the battlefield of the future – DeepSec Conference examines the Internet of Things

Sanna/ October 14, 2016/ Conference, Internet, Press, Security, Veranstaltung

The Internet of Things is knocking at your door. Many businesses and private individuals have already admitted IoT to their offices and homes, unfortunately often without knowing what they’ve let themselves in for. A naive belief in progress opens all gates, doors and windows to attackers. This is a serious matter. Therefore, DeepSec Conference will focus on this topic on the occasion of its 10th anniversary. The program includes lectures and workshops about the components of smart devices, smart houses and smart networks. Not all products come with a solid security concept. How to test if your devices function properly? What consequences has the total conversion to “smart”? How to proceed correctly to select appropriate systems? Hacked by your fridge Spectacular burglaries have always been the best material for screenplays. We know the scene

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DeepSec 2016 Workshop: Fundamentals of Routing and Switching from a Blue and Red Team Perspective – Paul Coggin

Sanna/ October 12, 2016/ Security, Training

Penetrating networks has never been easier. Given the network topology of most companies and organisations, security has been reduced to flat networks. There is an outside and an inside. If you are lucky there is an extra network for exposed services. Few departments have retained the skills to properly harden network equipment – and we haven’t even talked about the Internet of Things (IoT) catastrophe where anything is connected by all means necessary. Time to update your knowledge. Luckily we have just the right training for you! In Paul Coggins’ intense 2 day class, students will learn the fundamentals of routing and switching from a blue and red team perspective. Using hands-on labs they will receive practical experience with routing and switching technologies with a detailed discussion on how to attack and defend the network

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DeepSec2016 Talk: The (In)Security or Sad State of Online Newspapers – Ashar Javed

Sanna/ October 8, 2016/ Conference, Internet, Press

Web sites are simply, one might think. The client requests a page, the server sends it, the layout is applied, and your article appears. This is a heavy simplification. It worked like this back in 1994. Modern web sites are much more complex. And complexity attracts curious minds. Usually that’s what gets you into trouble. Now content management systems serve the web page of the 1990s with a lot of queries, executable code, and from different servers. The ever changing Top 10 list of mistakes from the Open Web Application Security Project can show you the tip of the iceberg. Ashar Javed took a closer look at online newspapers, and he found some scary stuff. The goal of his talk is to raise awareness about the (in)securities of online newspapers. Ashar Javed hopes that their

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DeepSec Video: Revisiting SOHO Router Attacks

René Pfeiffer/ March 1, 2016/ Conference, Security

Routers are everywhere. If you are connected to the Internet, your next router takes care of all packets. So basically your nearest router (or next hop as the packet girls and guys call them) is a prime target for attackers of any kind. Since hard-/software comes in various sizes, colours, and prices, there is a big difference in quality, i.e. how good your router can defend itself. Jose Antonio Rodriguez Garcia, Ivan Sanz de Castro, and Álvaro Folgado Rueda (independent IT security researchers) held a presentation about the security of small office/home office SOHO routers at DeepSec 2015. Domestic routers have lately been targeted by cybercrime due to the huge amount of well-known vulnerabilities which compromise their security. The purpose of our publication is to assess SOHO router security by auditing a sample of

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DeepSec Video: HORNET – High-speed Onion Routing at the Network Layer

René Pfeiffer/ February 22, 2016/ Conference, Internet, Security

Given that reconnaissance is the first step of a successful attack, anonymity has become more important than ever. The Invisible Internet Project (I2P) and the TOR project are prominent tools to protect against prying eyes (five or more). TOR is widely used. Users of anonymity services will notice that the price for extra protection is less speed in terms of latency and probably bandwidth. Researchers have published a method to attain high-speed network performance, called HORNET. HORNET is designed as a low-latency onion routing system that operates at the network layer thus enabling a wide range of applications. Our system uses only symmetric cryptography for data forwarding yet requires no per-flow state on intermediate nodes. This design enables HORNET nodes to process anonymous traffic at over 93 Gb/s. At DeepSec 2015 Chen Chen explained

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