Press Release: Digitalisation without Information Security has no Future

Sanna/ July 15, 2020/ Conference, Development, Discussion/ 0 comments

DeepSec conference warns of unsafe software and insufficient knowledge of professionals. The months in which we had to learn to deal with the effects of various quarantine measures on our everyday lives have decisively emphasized the importance of information technology. Although the Internet has long been an integral part of work and everyday life in many industries, the physical restrictions due to the Covid-19 pandemic could have been significantly more drastic for public authorities, the economy and society without modern telecommunications. Audio, video and chat platforms have prevented things getting worse. The call for more digitalisation, however, lacks the most important ingredient – information security. Published software is safe, isn’t it? In the world of software development, there is an unofficial saying that a product is ready when you can install it. The rest

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Communiqué de presse traduit: Les applis COVID-19 dévoilent leur logiciel pendant la crise

Sanna/ May 13, 2020/ Conference, Press, Training/ 0 comments

En novembre, la conférence sur la sécurité DeepSec mettra en lumière la mascarade des logiciels. On dit souvent, « il y a forcément une appli pour ça ! ». Cette formule toute faite est souvent prise à la légère, même en dehors du secteur informatique. La crise actuelle du COVID-19 a de nouveau désigné le code informatique comme solution universelle aux problèmes qui ne sont pas strictement liés à la technologie de l’information. La numérisation générique semble être la réponse à tous nos problèmes. Bien sûr, le traitement des données peut aider. À condition toutefois de posséder des données réelles, vérifiables et recueillies soigneusement. C’est là qu’échouent de nombreux projets. Téléphones magiques à l’intelligence infinie La demande d’applis n’a fait qu’augmenter ces dernières années. Ces visions n’ont rien à envier aux idées créatives des

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Translated Article: Ten EU Countries already rely on decentralized Corona Virus Apps

Sanna/ May 12, 2020/ Security, Stories/ 0 comments

Schon zehn EU-Staaten setzen auf dezentrale Coronavirus-Apps by Erich Moechel for fm4.orf.at Apple and Google also support the privacy-friendly, decentralized protocol DP-3T. Without technical support in the operating systems of these two groups, no app with Bluetooth tracing can deliver useful results. The decision by Austria and Switzerland to use a corona virus app with decentralized data storage (DP-3T) triggered a chain reaction. By Friday, ten EU countries had already left the large-scale “Pan-European Project for Data Protection-Compliant Person Tracing” (PEPP-PT). The centralized data collection of PEPP-PT leaves all possibilities for data mining open, a deanonymisation of the data is also included. Apple and Google, which support the DP-3T standard, are constantly publishing new specifications for the necessary app interfaces in Android and IOS. Without the support of these two companies, whose operating systems

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Translated Press Release: Covid-19 Apps show Software Development in Crisis

Sanna/ May 8, 2020/ Conference, Press, Training/ 0 comments

In November, the DeepSec security conference will highlight the software masquerade. In everyday language there is the saying “There’s an app for that!”. The phrase is often used as a joke, even outside the IT industry. The current Covid-19 crisis has once again addressed computer code as a universal solution to problems that are not exclusively related to information technology. Generic digitization seems to be the answer to all problems. Of course, data processing can help. The prerequisite for this, however, is the existence of real data that has also been collected in a comprehensible and careful manner. This is exactly why many projects fail. Magical phones with infinite Intelligence The call for apps has been repeated again and again in recent years. The visions are in no way inferior to the creative ideas

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Secure Design – Combining Information Security with Software Development

René Pfeiffer/ February 5, 2020/ Discussion, High Entropy

Information security researchers usually see software fail. Sometimes they try to make software fail on purpose. The result is a bug description, also called vulnerability report in case the bug has a security impact. The the best case scenario this information reaches the software developers who in turn fix the problem. Then the cycle continues. This process is fun for the first iterations. After a while it gets boring. Even a while after that you ask yourself why integer overflow, injection attacks, and basic cross-anything is still an issue. Some bug classes are well over 40 years old. Polio is far older, and yet we got rid of it (mostly). What’s different in the field of software creation? The answers are simple, endless, and change depending on the current trend. Just as computing changed

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Translated Article: Campaign of the Spy Alliance “Five Eyes” against WhatsApp and Co

Sanna/ January 8, 2019/ Discussion, High Entropy, Security

Feldzug der Spionageallianz „Five Eyes“ gegen WhatsApp und Co for fm4 by Erich Moechel The current scattered news and reports on “encryption” belong together. The military secret services of the “Five Eyes” conduct a global campaign; in Australia they’ve already reached their first milestone. Every two years, around the same time, a campaign of the espionage alliance “Five Eyes” against encryption programs takes place. Unlike in 2016, the new campaign has reached its first goal in a flash. In early December, a bill was passed in the Australian Parliament obliging Internet companies to break up encrypted communications. The providers of Whatsapp, Snapchat, and Co are hereby required to build surveillance interfaces into their apps to give hidden access to the Australian law enforcement. In a parliamentary coup – without discussion or amendments – the “Assistance

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ROOTS 2018: Library and Function Identification by Optimized Pattern Matching on Compressed Databases – Maximilian von Tschirschnitz

Sanna/ January 7, 2019/ ROOTS

[Editor’s note: This article belongs to the Reversing and Offensive-oriented Trends Symposium 2018 (ROOTS). It was misplaced, so we publish it today. Maximilian’s talk was recorded and can be watched on Vimeo.] The goal of library and function identification is to find the original library and function to a given machine-code snippet. These snippets commonly arise from penetration tests attacking a remote executable, static malware analysis or from an IP infringement investigation. While there are several tools designed to achieve this task, all of these seem to rely on varied methods of signature-based identification. In this work, the author argues that this approach is not sufficient for many cases and propose a design and implementation for a multitool called KISS. KISS uses lossless compression and highly optimized pattern matching algorithms to create a very

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ROOTS 2018 Talk: The Swift Language from a Reverse Engineering Perspective – Malte Kraus & Vincent Haupert

Sanna/ November 13, 2018/ Conference, ROOTS

Over the last decade, mobile devices have taken over the consumer market for computer hardware. Almost all these mobile devices run either Android or iOS as their operating systems. In 2014, Apple introduced the Swift programming language as an alternative to Objective C for writing iOS and macOS applications. The rising adoption of this new language has to some extent obsoleted existing techniques for program analysis for these platforms, like method swizzling and “class-dump”. In this paper we discuss features of Swift binaries that help in reverse engineering the functionality of the contained code: We document the memory layout of compound data types and the calling convention used by the Swift compiler, as well as the runtime type information that is used by runtime and debugger when data types are not known statically. This

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Last Call for your Web Application Security Training – Break all teh Web and enjoy it!

René Pfeiffer/ November 9, 2018/ Conference, Security

The Internet is full of web applications. Sysadmins used to joke that HTTP is short for Hypertext Tunnelling Protocol, because anything but web content is transported via HTTP these days. It’s the best way to break out of restricted environment, too. So the chances are good that you will need the skills for dealing with all kinds web. Fortunately our training Bug Hunting Millionaire: Mastering Web Attacks with Full-Stack Exploitation conducted by Dawid Czagan has a few seats left. Don’t get distracted by the title. Focus on the phrase full-stack exploitation. It’s not just about sending HTTP requests and seeing what the application does. It’s all about using the full spectrum of components and technologies used for modern web applications. The training is not only suited for information security researchers. The course addresses REST

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DeepSec 2018 Talk: Injecting Security Controls into Software Applications – Katy Anton

Sanna/ September 20, 2018/ Conference, Security

“SQL Injection was first mentioned in a 1998 article in Phrack Magazine. Twenty years later, injection is still a common occurrence in software applications (No.1 in latest OWASP Top 10 2017). For the last 20 years, we have been focusing on vulnerabilities from an attacker’s point of view and SQL injection is still King. Something else must be done.”, says Katy Anton. “What if there is another way to look at software vulnerabilities? Can vulnerabilities be decomposed into security controls familiar to developers? Which security controls are an absolute must-have, and which additional security measures do you need to take into account? These are hard questions as evidenced by the numerous insecure applications we still have today. Attend this talk to explore security vulnerabilities from a different angle. As part of this talk, we

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Disclosures, Jenkins, Conferences, and the Joys of 0Days

René Pfeiffer/ November 17, 2016/ Conference, Discussion, High Entropy

DeepSec 2016 was great. We have slightly recovered and deal with the aftermath in terms of administrivia. As announced on Twitter, we would like to publish a few thoughts on the remote code execution issue found by Matthias Kaiser. He mentioned the possibility in this presentation titled Java Deserialization Vulnerabilities – The Forgotten Bug Class. First let’s explain some things about how DeepSec runs the Call for Papers, the submissions, and the conference. During the Call for Papers process our speakers send us title, abstract, and mostly an in-depth description of the presentation’s content. This means that we usually know what’s going to happen, except for the things that are actually said and shown during the presentation slot. Since we do not offer any live video streams and publish all presentation slides after we

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DeepSec 2016 Workshop: Do-It-Yourself Patching: Writing Your Own Micropatch – Mitja Kolsek

Sanna/ October 13, 2016/ Conference, Development, Security, Training

The current state of updating software – be it operating systems, applications or appliances – is arguably much better than it was a decade ago, but apparently not nearly good enough to keep even the most critical systems patched in a timely manner – or at all, says Mitja Kolsek. Official vendor updates are cumbersome, costly to apply, even more costly to revert and prone to breaking things as they replace entire chunks of a product. Enterprises are therefore left with extensive and expensive testing of such updates before they dare to apply them in production, which gives attackers an endless supply of “n-day” vulnerabilities with published exploit code. Furthermore, for various entirely rational reasons, many organizations are using products with no security updates such as old Java runtimes, Windows XP, or expensive industry

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Thoughts on Lawful Malicious Software and its Impact on IT Infrastructure

Sanna/ April 14, 2016/ Interview, Press, Security

During the premiere of „A Good American“ we had a chat with journalists. Markus Sulzbacher of Der Standard wanted to know what the implication of the so-called Bundestrojaner (litterally federal trojan, the colloquial German term for the concept of inserting government malware in order to extract information from a suspect’s computer and telephone devices). The idea is to infect a computer system with malicious software that sits in the background and to siphon off the hard-to-get data connected to communication (i.e. messengers, Skype, emails, etc.). We have translated the interview from German to English for you. You can find the original on Der Standard web site. Der Standard 12.04.2016 “The federal Trojan is governmental malware” Police praise the software as a “wonder weapon against terror”. But for IT expert René Pfeiffer the planned introduction

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Return of the Penguin Challenge – ELF (?) Binary (?)

René Pfeiffer/ April 5, 2016/ High Entropy

Our friends from BSidesLondon have set up a challenge for you. It’s a little ELF binary with some odd properties. That’s all we will tell you. Have a look for yourself. In case you are forensically inclined, we might have a little Call for Papers email for you. There is a lot of strange code around in the Internet and other networks. Decoding what code does without getting your san(d)box blown apart is a fine art. We are interested in getting in touch with researchers in the field of malicious software and digital forensics. Software developers need to know what you have seen. So if you got some ideas, research, or interesting content, drop us your email address.

DeepSec Video: HackingTeam – How They Infected Your Android Device By 0days

René Pfeiffer/ February 20, 2016/ Conference, Discussion, High Entropy, Security

Backdoors are very popular these days. Not only cybercrime likes extra access, governments like it too. There’s even a lucrative market for insecurity. You can buy everything your IT team defends against legally. Hacking Team is/was one of the companies supplying 0days along with intrusive software to take over client systems. Attila Marosi explained at DeepSec 2015 how products of Hacking Team were used to attack and compromise Android clients. There is no need to make a long introduction when speaking about the famous Remote Control System (RCS), the product of the Italian company Hacking Team. The huge amount – 400 GB – of leaked data gives rise to lengthy discussion and is extremely concerning for every part of the professionally, politically or even those superficially interested only. Enjoy Attila’s presentation. Be careful about

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