DeepSec 2018 Training: Advanced Penetration Testing in the Real World – Davy Douhine & Guillaume Lopes

Sanna/ September 24, 2018/ Conference, Security, Training

Guillaume and Davy, senior pentesters, will share many techniques, tips and tricks with pentesters, red teamers, bug bounty researchers or even defenders during a 2-day 100% “hands-on” workshop. This is the very training you’d like to have instead of wasting your precious time trying and failing while pentesting. The main topics of the training are: Buffer overflow 101: Find and exploit buffer overflows yourself and bypass OS protections. (A lot of pentesters don’t even know how it works. So let’s have a look under the hood); Web exploitation: Manually find and exploit web app vulnerabilities using Burpsuite. (Yes, running WebInspect, AppScan, Acunetix or Netsparker is fine but you can do a lot more by hand); Network exploitation: Manually exploit network related vulnerabilities using Scapy, ettercap and Responder. (Because it works so often when doing

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DeepSec 2018 Training: Attacking Internet of Things with Software Defined Radio – Johannes Pohl

Sanna/ September 10, 2018/ Conference, Security, Training

In Johannes Pohls training participants will learn how to reverse engineer the wireless communication between Internet of Things (IoT) devices with Software Defined Radios (SDR) using the Universal Radio Hacker (URH). The workshop covers required HF (high frequency) basics such as digital modulations and encodings and shows how to reveal the protocol logic step by step and, finally, how to develop attacks against devices. For demonstration they will investigate and attack a wireless socket and a smart home door lock. During the course of the workshop the communication of the two devices will be analyzed and reverse engineered. In conclusion, attacks on both devices will be developed. By the end of the workshop participants will be able to switch the socket and open the door lock with SDRs. This of course requires knowledge in the

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DeepSec Training: Bug Bounty Hunting – How Hackers Find SQL Injections in Minutes with Sqlmap

René Pfeiffer/ September 7, 2018/ Security, Training

In a previous article we talked about the Bug Bounty Hunting training by Dawid Czagan at DeepSec 2018. In case you do now know what to expect, there is a little teaser consisting of a full blown tutorial for you. Dawid has published as video tutorial that shows you how to use Sqlmap in order to find SQL injections. It serves as a perfect example of what to expect from his two-day training and what you absolutely need to play with for preparation. DeepSec trainings are in-depth, not superficial. Dawid’s training will go into much deeper detail. Software developers are well advised to use attack tools against their own creations. It helps to understand what error conditions your code might be in and what you have to do when sanitising data. SQL injection attacks

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DeepSec 2018 Special Training: Bug Hunting Millionaire – Mastering Web Attacks with Full-Stack Exploitation

René Pfeiffer/ August 29, 2018/ Conference, Security, Training

How do bugs in software get fixed? Well, first of all you have to find them. All code has bugs. Most probably, that is. Usually developers and users of applications find bugs. The history of information security has taught us that now attackers also look for bugs in software. Therefore flaws in code leading to security vulnerabilities have a higher priority for both developers and adversaries. The problem is that software testing finds all kinds of bugs and not always the important ones. Where is the incentive to go and debug software? Well, there is quality assurance, there is full disclosure, and now there are bug bounties. Bug bounties are rewards for bugs in software that have an impact on security. Companies offer these bounties as a means of software quality testing. Bug bounties

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DeepSec 2018 Training: Hunting with OSSEC – Xavier Mertens

Sanna/ August 28, 2018/ Conference, Training

“OSSEC is sometimes described as a low-cost log management solution but it has many interesting features which, when combined with external sources of information, may help in hunting for suspicious activity occurring on your servers and end-points”, says Xavier Mertens, who’s giving a training called “Hunting with OSSEC” at this years DeepSec. “During this training, you will learn the basic of OSSEC and its components, how to deploy it and quickly get results. Then I will demonstrate how to deploy specific rules to catch suspicious activities. From an input point of view, we will see how easy it is to learn new log formats to increase the detection scope and, from an output point of view, how we can generate alerts by interconnecting OSSEC with other tools like MISP, TheHive or an ELK Stack

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DeepSec 2017 Workshop: Smart Lockpicking – Hands-on Exploiting Contemporary Locks and Access Control Systems – Slawomir Jasek

Sanna/ October 31, 2017/ Conference, Training

You can, quite reasonably, expect smart locks and access control systems to be free from alarming security vulnerabilities – such a common issue for an average IoT device. Well, this training will prove you wrong. After performing multiple hands-on exercises with a dozen of real devices and various technologies, you will never look at the devices the same way. Smart lockpicking is something to scare you, not just on Halloween.     We asked Slawomir a few questions about his training: Please tell us the top 5 facts about your workshop. Focused on hands-on, practical exercises with real devices Lots of various topics and technologies covered Regardless if you are a beginner or a skilled pentester, you will learn something new and have a good time Many exercises designed as “homework”, possible to repeat

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DeepSec2017 Workshop: Mobile App Attack – Sneha Rajguru

Sanna/ October 16, 2017/ Conference, Training

The world’s gone mobile. Mobile devices have surpassed the standard computer (i.e. desktop) installation multiple times. In turn this means that you will encounter these devices most definitely when testing or implementing security measures. Usually adversaries do not use the platform itself. They use software to gain entry. This is why mobiles apps are the most preferred way of delivering the attacks today. Understanding the finer details of mobile app attacks is soon becoming an essential skill for penetration testers as well as for the app developers & testers. This is why we have a special training for you at DeepSec 2017. So, if you are an Android or an iOS user, a developer, a security analyst, a mobile pen-tester, or just a mobile security enthusiast the training ‘Mobile App Attack’ is of definite

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DeepSec 2017 Early Bird Tariff ends on 25 September

René Pfeiffer/ September 22, 2017/ Administrivia, Conference

The early bird tariff for DeepSec 2017 (and ROOTS) ends on 25 September 2017. We recommend buying your ticket now. Save some money! In addition we ask you to book the workshop you want to visit as early as possible! Every year we see sad faces, because the workshop of your choice had to be cancelled. Our trainers need a minimum number of attendees. Some trainers need to catch flights and spend good parts of a whole day travelling. They can’t come to Vienna if the minimum number of trainees is not met. So do yourself a favour, make up your mind now, and book the training you want to have. In case you cannot use online payment, let us know. We can invoice the ticket to you directly, if needed. Just drop us

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DeepSec 2017 Training: The ARM IoT Exploit Laboratory

René Pfeiffer/ August 29, 2017/ Conference, Security, Training

If the Internet of Things (IoT) will ever leave puberty, it has to deal with the real world. This means dealing with lies, fraud, abuse, exploits, overload, bad tempered clients (and servers), and much more. Analysing applications is best done by looking at what’s behind the scenes. IoT devices, their infrastructure, billions of mobile devices, and servers are powered by processors using the Advanced RISC Machine (ARM) architecture. This design is different from the (still?) widespread Intel® x86 or the AMD™ AMD64 architecture. For security researchers dealing with exploits the change of design means that the assembly language and the behaviour of the processor is different. Developing ways to inject and modify code requires knowledge. Now for everyone who has dealt with opcodes, registers and oddities of CPUs, this is nothing new. Grab the

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DeepSec 2017 Preliminary Schedule published

René Pfeiffer/ August 17, 2017/ Administrivia, Conference, Training

After two weeks of intense reviewing we have published the preliminary schedule for DeepSec 2017. There are some blanks to fill, but this will be done in the coming weeks. We still have to do some reviews and wait for the speaker’s confirmation. In case you noticed, the ROOTS track is not filled yet. The call for papers was extended to 26 August. This means the ROOTS schedule will be published at the end of September. We have to give the programme committee ample time to review all submissions. So if you want to present your research at ROOTS 2017, please ready your submission. Science first!

Unicorns in the Wild – Information Security Skills and how to achieve them

René Pfeiffer/ July 27, 2017/ Discussion, High Entropy, Security

Everyone talks about information security, countering „cyber“ threats, endless feats of hackers gone wrong/wild, and more epic stories. Once you have realised that you are reading the news and not a script for a TV series, you are left with one question: What are information security skills? The next question will probably be: How do you train to be „information secure“? Let’s take a look at possible answers. First of all, yes, you can study information security or security-related topics. Universities, schools, and companies offer lectures, training, exercises, etc. Great. However it may not help you right away. We talked with top quality head hunters from a nameless big corporation. When they look for infosec specialists, they filter for anyone having worked in three different fields related to computer science (applied or otherwise) for

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DeepSec 2016: Social Engineering remains the most dangerous Threat to Companies – DeepSec offers a Workshop on the Defence of social Manipulation as part of IT

Sanna/ November 3, 2016/ Conference, Press, Schedule, Training

If you follow the news on information security, you see superlative after superlative. Millions of passwords were stolen. Hundreds of thousands of cameras suddenly became tools for blackmail. Countless data got copied unauthorized. Often, after a few paragraphs, your read about technical solutions that should put a stop to these burglaries. Therefore one forgets that nowadays hermetically locked doors can be easily opened just by a telephone call or an e-mail message. According to a publication of the British Federation of Small Businesses, almost 50% of attacks are social engineering attacks, which means attacks through social manipulation.Thus, investments in technical defense measures remain completely ineffective. Mere security awareness does not help anymore In the past approaches to defend against attacks on the weak spot human being have focused on awareness trainings. But in our

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DeepSec 2016 Workshop: Do-It-Yourself Patching: Writing Your Own Micropatch – Mitja Kolsek

Sanna/ October 13, 2016/ Conference, Development, Security, Training

The current state of updating software – be it operating systems, applications or appliances – is arguably much better than it was a decade ago, but apparently not nearly good enough to keep even the most critical systems patched in a timely manner – or at all, says Mitja Kolsek. Official vendor updates are cumbersome, costly to apply, even more costly to revert and prone to breaking things as they replace entire chunks of a product. Enterprises are therefore left with extensive and expensive testing of such updates before they dare to apply them in production, which gives attackers an endless supply of “n-day” vulnerabilities with published exploit code. Furthermore, for various entirely rational reasons, many organizations are using products with no security updates such as old Java runtimes, Windows XP, or expensive industry

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DeepSec 2016 Workshop: Hacking Web Applications – Case Studies of award-winning Bugs in Google, Yahoo!, Mozilla and more – Dawid Czagan

Sanna/ September 2, 2016/ Conference, Internet, Security, Training

Have you been to the pictures lately? If so, what’s the best way to attack an impenetrable digital fortress? Right, go for the graphical user interface! Or anything exposed to the World Wide Web. The history of web applications is riddled with bugs that enable attackers to do things they are not supposed to. We bet that you have something exposed on the Web and even probably don’t know about it. Don’t worry. Instead attend the DeepSec training session „Hacking Web Applications“ conducted by Dawid Czagan. He will teach you about what to look for when examining web applications with a focus on information security. This hands-on web application hacking training is based on authentic, award-winning security bugs identified in some of the greatest companies (Google, Yahoo!, Mozilla, Twitter, etc.). You will learn how bug hunters

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Talk/Workshop: SAP Security In-Depth

René Pfeiffer/ August 31, 2011/ Conference

No two SAP deployments are the same. If you run an SAP environment, then you will most certainly use customisations and a multi-tier architecture. You will have tied your SAP deployment to your assets. The typical setup features Development, Quality Assurance and Production (which is the minimal amount of tiers, you may have more). While the development and IT staff mainly interacts with Development and Quality Assurance environments, the organisation’s end-user only connects to the Production systems in order to undertake the required business processes. As soon as security considerations come into play you will probably audit your infrastructure. Since auditors cost money most SAP deployments won’t be scrutinised completely. And then you are in trouble despite passing tests with flying colours. Using short-cuts is the best way to run into trouble. Consider your multi-tier

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