DeepSec 2019 Workshop: Attacks on the Diffie-Hellman Protocol – Denis Kolegov & Innokentii Sennovskii

Sanna/ September 27, 2019/ Conference, Security

This workshop is a hands-on task-based study of the Diffie-Hellman protocol and its modern extensions focusing on vulnerabilities and attacks. It is not a full day training, but it will be held during the conference. Everyone interested in applied cryptography and attacks connected to this topics should attend. Seats are limited! Some of the topics that will be highlighted: Diffie-Hellman key exchange Elliptic-curve Diffie-Hellman Variants of Diffie-Hellman protocol: Ephemeral, static, anonymous, authenticated Diffie-Hellman X3DH, Noise and SIGMA protocols Forward secrecy and post-compromise security Small-subgroup attack Pollard’s rho and lambda algorithms Invalid curve attack Curve twist attack Protocol attacks (MitM, replay, KCI, UKS) Labs: Small subgroup attack against multiplicative group DH Invalid curve attack against ECDH Twist attack KCI attack Key Takeaways Learn about Diffie-Hellman key exchange Learn about applying Diffie-Hellman in modern protocols Hands-on

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Ongoing DeepSec Call for Workshops – Trainers welcome!

René Pfeiffer/ April 2, 2019/ Call for Papers, Training

The Call for Workshops for the DeepSec conference in November 2019 is still open. If you have something to teach, let us know as soon as possible! We intend to inform potential trainees in the beginning of May about their options. This allows for a better planning and preparation, because we receive early requests for workshop content every year. So if you have something to teach, please let us know! You don’t need to use the Call for Papers manager in case you have content ready in a different format or just want to send us teaser materials. Topics we are looking for include (applied) cryptography, secure software development & design, helpful in-depth hints for penetration testers, sensible guides for combining machine learning/artificial intelligence with information security, in-depth network knowledge, threat hunting, and strategic

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DeepSec 2018 Special Training: Bug Hunting Millionaire – Mastering Web Attacks with Full-Stack Exploitation

René Pfeiffer/ August 29, 2018/ Conference, Security, Training

How do bugs in software get fixed? Well, first of all you have to find them. All code has bugs. Most probably, that is. Usually developers and users of applications find bugs. The history of information security has taught us that now attackers also look for bugs in software. Therefore flaws in code leading to security vulnerabilities have a higher priority for both developers and adversaries. The problem is that software testing finds all kinds of bugs and not always the important ones. Where is the incentive to go and debug software? Well, there is quality assurance, there is full disclosure, and now there are bug bounties. Bug bounties are rewards for bugs in software that have an impact on security. Companies offer these bounties as a means of software quality testing. Bug bounties

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ROOTS 2018 Call for Papers – Deadline extended

René Pfeiffer/ August 27, 2018/ Administrivia, Call for Papers

ROOTS‘ deadline for abstract submissions has been extended. The new deadline is the 17 September 2018. Authors will be notified by 30 September 2018. We need your camera-ready papers until 13 October 2018. Please spread the word. The Reversing and Offensive-Oriented Trends Symposium 2018 still accepts your research. We are looking forward to the results of your work. Information security is all about well-researched facts and reproducible findings. If you need some more time to prepare your submission, this is the time. Let us know if you need help when submitting. The first European symposium of its kind, ROOTS aims to provide an industry-friendly academic platform to discuss trends in exploitation, reversing, offensive techniques, and effective protections. Submissions should provide novel attack forms, describe novel reversing techniques, or effective deployable defences. Submissions can also

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DeepSec 2018 Conference “Smart is the new Cyber” – Preliminary Schedule published

René Pfeiffer/ August 17, 2018/ Conference, Schedule, Security

The preliminary schedule for DeepSec 2018 has been published. It took us some time to select and review all submissions. We cracked the 100 submissions mark, thus we are pleased that you made it very difficult for us this year. The number of slots for presentations and workshops has been constant. The number of content being submitted is steadily growing. So we hope we did a good job and that you find a pleasant mixture of topics (as pleasant as information security can get). All speakers have been informed. There may be some changes to the schedule which we will announce on our blog. The abstracts of every presentation and workshop will be discussed in-depth here on the blog as well. We have asked the trainers and speakers some questions. As soon as we

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DeepSec 2017 Workshop: Hunting The Adversary – Developing And Using Threat Intelligence – John Bambenek

René Pfeiffer/ October 12, 2017/ Conference, Security Intelligence, Training

The arsenal of components you can use for securing your organisation’s digital assets is vast. The market offers a sheer endless supply of application level gateways (formerly know as „firewalls“), network intrusion detection/prevention systems, anti-virus filters for any kind of platform (almost down to the refrigerator in the office), security tokens, biometrics, strong cryptography (just stay away from the fancy stuff), and all kinds of Big Data applications that can turn shoddy metrics into beautiful forecasts of Things to Come™ (possibly with a Magic Quadrant on top, think cherry). What could possibly go wrong? Well, it seems attackers still compromise systems, copy protected data, and get away with it. Why is that? Easy: You lack threat intelligence. Security often doesn’t „add up“, i.e. you cannot improve your „security performance“ by buying fancy appliances/applications and

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DeepSec2017 Workshop: SAP CTF Pentest : From Outside To Company Salaries Tampering – Yvan Genuer

Sanna/ October 10, 2017/ Conference, Training

The SAP business suite is widespread among enterprises. It is the heart of the operation, at least in terms of business logic, administration, accounting, and many other cornerstones of big companies. SAP itself was founded in 1972. Its software has now grown up and lives with the Internet and cloud platforms next door. Due to the SAP software being a platform itself, it is quite unwieldy for hackers to handle. If you believe this, then we recommend the SAP CTF Pentest training at DeepSec 2017! Yvan Genuer has something to show to you: SAP is boring, too big or too complicated? What about learning SAP Security during a fun CTF workshop? Additionally we’ll provide you with a pre-configured attacker VM with all tools required to perform workshop activities. Attendees learn how to work against

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DeepSec 2017 Schedule Update, Review Status, Disputes, and Trainings

René Pfeiffer/ September 26, 2017/ Administrivia, Conference, High Entropy

The DeepSec 2017 schedule is still preliminary. We are almost done, and we have a small update. Some of you have noticed that the schedule featured a training about mobile security. The outline as shown as in the schedule was identical to a different course from a different trainer. We received a complaint, we got the course materials to compare, and it turned out that only the outline of the workshop as shown online was identical, and the original table of contents was not part of the submission we received during the call for papers. The dispute has been settled. The trainer has apologised to the creator of the original table of contents. Nevertheless the trainer has asked to withdraw his submission. This means we will try to replace the slot in the schedule

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Workshops, Trainings, Talks: DeepSec and ROOTS Schedule Update

René Pfeiffer/ September 20, 2017/ Administrivia, Conference

As you might have noticed, the DeepSec schedule is not complete yet. Furthermore the ROOTS schedule is not published at all. The reason for this are the still pending reviews. The major part concerns ROOTS. ROOTS is an academic workshop where academic publications are presented. There has been some confusion about the term workshop. In the context of ROOTS this means presentations. This is why we have replaced the word workshops on the DeepSec web site and in (hopefully) all texts with the word training. Trainings are the two-day, well, trainings in advance of the DeepSec conference days. ROOTS features presentations, also called workshops in ROOTS-context, as does the DeepSec conference (on the conference days). So we have trainings (the two-day training courses; one, the ARM exploit laboratory is for three days, be careful)

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DeepSec2016 Workshop: IoT Hacking: Linux Embedded, Bluetooth Smart, KNX Home Automation – Slawomir Jasek

Sanna/ October 31, 2016/ Conference, Internet, Security

“The ongoing rise of the machines leaves no doubt – we have to face them”, says Slawomir Jasek, and adds: “It is hard not to agree with one of the greatest military strategists Sun Tzu: “If you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be put at risk even in a hundred battles”. Right now it is about time to fill that gap in your skills by confronting the devices, learning their flaws, catalog ways to defeat them, and – above all – develop means to reduce the risk and regain control.” Slawomir’s training consists of several modules: 1. Linux embedded Linux embedded is probably the most popular OS, especially in SOHO equipment like routers, cameras, smart plugs, alarms, bulbs, home automation, and even wireless rifles. Based on several examples, you will learn

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DeepSec2016 Workshop: Offensive PowerShell for Red and Blue Teams – Nikhil Mittal

Sanna/ October 14, 2016/ Conference, Security, Training

Penetration Tests and Red Team operations for secured environments need altered approaches, says Nikhil Mittal. You cannot afford to touch disks, throw executables and use memory corruption exploits without the risk of being ineffective as a simulated adversary. To enhance offensive tactics and methodologies, PowerShell is the tool of choice. PowerShell has changed the way Windows networks are attacked – it is Microsoft’s shell and scripting language available by default in all modern Windows computers and can interact with .Net, WMI, COM, Windows API, Registry and other computers on a Windows Domain. This makes it imperative for Penetration Testers and Red Teams to learn PowerShell. Nikhil Mittals training is aimed towards attacking Windows networks using PowerShell. It is based on real world penetration tests and Red Team engagements for highly secured environments. We asked Nikhil

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DeepSec 2016 Workshop: Fundamentals of Routing and Switching from a Blue and Red Team Perspective – Paul Coggin

Sanna/ October 12, 2016/ Security, Training

Penetrating networks has never been easier. Given the network topology of most companies and organisations, security has been reduced to flat networks. There is an outside and an inside. If you are lucky there is an extra network for exposed services. Few departments have retained the skills to properly harden network equipment – and we haven’t even talked about the Internet of Things (IoT) catastrophe where anything is connected by all means necessary. Time to update your knowledge. Luckily we have just the right training for you! In Paul Coggins’ intense 2 day class, students will learn the fundamentals of routing and switching from a blue and red team perspective. Using hands-on labs they will receive practical experience with routing and switching technologies with a detailed discussion on how to attack and defend the network

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DeepSec 2016 Talk: Fuzzing Remote Interfaces for System Services in Android – Alexandru Blanda

Sanna/ September 23, 2016/ Conference, Security

When in doubt, go for the core. This statement is true for most Star Wars films. It is also valid for any kind of security research. Modern software has tons of dependencies, metric or otherwise. In addition, most platforms provide a set of basic components accessible by API. The wheel has been invented already. So if you look for weaknesses, addressing these fundamentals is a good idea. Why start at the outer shell, when you can directly go to the foundation of the walls. Siege warfare used to be like that. What happens when you combine the technique of fuzzing with accessible interfaces will be explained by Alexandru Blanda in his presentation at DeepSec 2016. System services represent one of the core components in Android, implementing many fundamental Android features such as media playback,

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DeepSec2016 Workshop: Secure Web Development – Marcus Niemietz

Sanna/ September 21, 2016/ Development, Security, Training

The World Wide Web is everywhere. It has become the standard protocol for transferring data, accessing applications, configuring devices, controlling software, or even multimedia streaming. Most software development can’t be done without web applications. Despite the easy concept the technologies used in „HTTP/HTTPS“ have grown in very complex beasts. Few get it right, lots of developers make mistakes and end up at the wrong side of a security presentation at a conference. Fortunately there is help. We offer you a workshop at DeepSec 2016 to make your web software development great again! The “Secure Web Development” training by Marcus Niemietz systematically covers the OWASP Top 10 threats as well as threats, which may be important in the future (e.g. HTML5 and AngularJS attacks). At the end of the training each attendee will be able to create her/his

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DeepSec 2016 Workshop: Deploying Secure Applications with TLS – Juraj Somorovsky

Sanna/ September 9, 2016/ Security, Training

Cryptography is all around us. It has become something like the background radiation of the networked world. We use it on a daily basis. Since nothing usually comes into existence by mistake, there must be someone responsible for deploying this crypto stuff. You are right. Software developers, mathematicians, engineers, system administrators, and many more people are involved to make encryption happen. The hard part is to get it right. The mathematics involved is hard. A lot can go wrong. This is why we have a workshop for you at DeepSec 2016! Have you (or your manager) ever wondered why your server is getting bad grades from SSL labs? Or are you interested in improving the performance of your TLS server? If you answer one of these question with “yes”, you should consider to take part in the

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